The Treehouse + The Cave


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Tuesday, May 31, 2005

Portal

Portal

Image by djwess

Blogger hello thought:

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May 13, 2011 at 9:47 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Bodega

Ghetto 6-Pack

When I hear the word bodega or even think of one, I see this image. It is a container for all my experiences with or within the crowded and minimal shops. For me, the two are synonymous. One is the other.

Blogger Andy thought:

Actually, I don't think I see an image at all. It's more like a 3-D model that I can disassemble and reassemble. Something not all together different from a suped-up QuickTime VR.

The mixed six-pack floats lazily in my mind, easily rotated and examined. Once I've glanced at it for a moment, I can access all the information filed under it.

It's as though the image is a folder that I can invisibly double-click, revealing all the smells, sounds, images, and thoughts that I have associated with the visual proxy.

The image, the icon is a portal to my memories. A necessary pit-stop between the word bodega and my understanding of one.

The whole process takes a fraction of a second. In fact, I'm barely aware that I do it anymore.

A.

May 31, 2005 at 5:51 PM - Comment Permalink  

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You And I

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Friday, May 27, 2005

Insurance

Health Insurance

As usual, Sarah and I have been reading the same kids and asking the same questions.

What does it say about the state of creative youth (let alone the state of U.S. healthcare), that we need to barter street cred to transnational corporations for checkups and antibiotics?

Blogger hipp-o thought:

call me crazy, but i think tylenol might be advertising to this community in hopes that they buy large quantities of their acetaminophen to perform suicide with.

seriously, right? kill two birds with one stone.

first, make a decent amount of money when the youth you are targeting buy 2-300 of your pills to try to kill themselves. its especially effective marketing when the kids who dont win the prize realize that not only have they lost the contest, but now they have no health insurance - basically rubbing it in that these kids live in a society with no social protection, support for the arts, or healthcare.

the capitalists in the room might now be jumping up and down saying, "why would any self respecting company try to kill their customers? it reduces future earning potential!"

hah! i say, i havent made my second point ----

----getting a few of these "liberal artist brat commies" who may one day vote democratic, or god forbid protest for health rights, to kill themselves only goes to further the strength of the already disgustingly stong drug lobby. destroy the opposition and make a buck! BRILLIANT!

May 30, 2005 at 10:43 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Thursday, May 26, 2005

Storms

Storms

My crops due these photographs little justice. Storms in Australia on Tiny Vices.

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Wednesday, May 25, 2005

Shearing Layers of Change

Shearing Layers of Change - Small
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"Because of the different rates of change of its components, a building is always tearing itself apart."

Illustration and text from How Buildings Learn: What Happens After They're Built by Stewart Brand creator of The Whole Earth Catalog

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Mirror

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Monday, May 23, 2005

Summer Storm

Summer Storm - Small
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The first summer storm, fading from blue-black to yellow-green, hovered over much of the city Saturday afternoon. It flipped off to on, faster than the people could run.

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Unmerry Prankster

Unmerry Prankster

Like many, I awoke yesterday to the New York Times. Specifically, to the Steven Kurutz's story Unmerry Prankster, which Wooster Collective discussed early in the day, igniting coverage in the blogosphere.

Like many peripherally associated with the kids featured in the article, I have heard various incomplete accounts of the events that unfolded that night at 31 Grand, just a month or so after I had arrived on these islands. I remember following those rumors closely, studying their characters and connections; naively trying to determine how the young art world functioned, how ambition manifested itself, in my new home. So, while I will fully admit that my desire to finally understand what actually happened easily carried me through the piece, I should also mention that I feel the story does young artists making work in New York City a huge disservice. Kurutz's article continues to traffic in the kinds of stereotypes that fracture an already overly competitive community. To the great majority of artists, the scene is secondary. It's the Art, not the antics, that keep us in the game.

Additionally, I take offense at the Times' choice to censor Michelle Cortez's self-portrait, by obscuring her breasts with the image of Simon Curtis. This artwork is absolutely central to the story, as is the content of this particular artwork. To modify this work (in a transparent attempt to placate some of the Times' readership) is to withhold necessary information from very same readership. This is not a pornographic image, nor is it misogynist, and I see little rational ground for censorship. Personally, I find the violation of an artwork far more offensive than any portrayal of the female anatomy.

Did anyone else react the same way upon flipping to the City section in the Sunday sun?

Blogger heather thought:

you're frustrated by the censorship itself, but what about the form that censorship takes? his body imposed on hers? more specifically, his face on her breasts? the visual language of these two photographs constitutes the misogyny here, i'd say.

May 27, 2005 at 8:50 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Friday, May 20, 2005

How Do You Predict The Future?

That's easy.

How do you create the future? That's hard.

Over the years, I've probably written a dozen columns about how to predict the future. The process is pretty simple, really. Just look for a logical vector from the past to the present, then use a bit of English to predict a second vector from the present to the future, because there is always a kink precisely at the point we call "today." Recalculate occasionally so the vector turns into a curve and converges on some date you've chosen in the future. What makes predicting the future easier than creating it is that only observation and thought are required, and that vector is the sum of all forces, seen and unseen. Creating the future, in contrast, requires lots of work, and all the forces generally have to be summoned or at least enticed by the creators, which makes it a combination of engineering, marketing and voodoo. Unseen forces, rather than being automatically integrated, are what kill you.

Text by Robert X. Cringely

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The World Is Yours?

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Thursday, May 19, 2005

Sing To Me

Sing To Me

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New York State Of New

New York State Of New

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Ceci N'est Pas Une Chèque

This Is Not A Check

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Wednesday, May 18, 2005

On Camera

On Camera

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Tuesday, May 17, 2005

Eyes

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Blogging and the Arts

This evening Rhizome.org is hosting the second Blogging and the Arts panel discussion at the New Museum of Contemporary Art. I'm not usually one for talks, but I think it'd be a little wrong to miss this. Blogs have the potential to radically change the fine arts community, just as they have the worlds of journalism and politics; I'm glad to finally see artists and the institutions that support them embracing (or at least acknowledging) the form. Here's the press release:

Blogging and the Arts
Tuesday, May 17, 2005, 6:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

Location:
New Museum of Contemporary Art / Chelsea
556 West 22nd Street

Rhizome.org Director of Technology Francis Hwang will lead a panel discussion on Blogging and the Arts. This panel, the second in a series hosted by Rhizome.org, includes painter and web-artist Chris Ashley, painter Joy Garnett, artist and programmer Patrick May, and writer Liza Sabater. The discussion will address issues such as ways that artists are using blogs to distribute their own work, and the influence of blogging culture on political issues of interest to those in the arts.

Founded in 1996, Rhizome.org is an internet-based platform for the global new media arts community. Through programs such as publications, online discussion, art commissions, and archiving, it supports the creation, presentation, discussion, and preservation of contemporary art using new technologies. Since 2003, Rhizome.org has been affiliated with the New Museum of Contemporary Art.

Blogger TIBOR thought:

did you go? what did you think?

May 18, 2005 at 9:48 PM - Comment Permalink  
Anonymous sarah thought:

If you went, could you please post your thoughts here and on Forward Retreat?

Thanks--wish I could've been there, but alas...

-Sarah

May 18, 2005 at 10:28 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

Guys, I did go, and am still collecting my thoughts. I expect a post to come of it...

A.

May 20, 2005 at 7:09 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Monday, May 16, 2005

Christian Paine

Christian Paine

I walk by the first of these tags every day, to and from work, and have for months now. I've had the image of it just as long, cropped and ready to go. But it was lonely, and wasn't complete; it needed a peer to the right. I found that peer weeks after taking the first text, and weeks prior to today, while riding the shuttle bus that replaces much of the L on recent weekends.

The bus was packed, stuffed far past code, the windows perspiring. Heather and I had slid the window open next to our coveted seats, preferring the cold drizzle of that Saturday to the steam seeping from the other straphangers. Through that fresh 3-inch break in the damp glass, we watched our new neighborhood fade into our old one, noting the progress of gentrification; that Montrose is the new Lorimer, Dekalb the new Montrose, us the new Morgan.

Through that break in the damp glass, I saw the second of these tags (the only other piece by Christian Paine I had seen longer than his name) and desperately attempted to note the intersection, knowing that I could never have photographed it through the condensation and rain.

I was unable to record the actual location, but felt that I could find it again, drawing a red line on the map in my head. I attempted one morning when I awoke an hour early, exiting the train prematurely and wandering around the area between Jefferson and Morgan; an area I should know better by now than I do. The search was fruitless, and as I grew later for work, I abandoned my quest for that day's content.

As it turns out, it was a dry run for this morning's stroll through the industrial quarter. Armed with reconnaissance from Heather's ride yesterday along the same detour on the same crowded shuttle, I was able to find the piece in question; just 2 blocks past the perimeter I had stumbled towards the first time around.

Related: In this town I’m the leper with the most fingers.

Blogger screetus thought:

That's cool -- every closed subway due to construction is an opportunity or something.
I'd take the L over a shuttle bus though. Fuck dat shit.

May 16, 2005 at 6:59 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Sunday, May 15, 2005

Mirror

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Artist's Statement

Nearly These Words

In any of my sketchbooks, buried somewhere within generations of my statement, you'll find nearly these words.

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Saturday, May 14, 2005

Never Give Up

Never Give Up

What I believe to be incense packaging. It reads:

NEVER GIVE UP

This paper is woodfree, it is handmade from 100% Recycle material & is a product of Tibetan Refugee

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Home Life

Home Life 4

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Search Terms

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Live Voicemail

Sometimes when your cell rings you don't feel like answering it. You hit Cancel and let it go to voicemail. Then you wait for the voicemail icon to show up, at which point you hold down the 1 until it dials your voicemail. Then you enter your 4-digit password. Then you listen to some robot. Then you hear what the person who called 5 minutes ago had to say.

Why can't it work like this:

Someone calls, you don't want to talk to them, so you hit a button on your cell to activate a Live Voicemail feature. Your cell goes into Speaker Mode, and you begin to hear your recorded greeting. You then hear, live, the caller as they leave their message. It would be just like an answering machine, and just like an answering machine you'd have the option to hit the Call button and interupt their message to begin a conversation.

The present voicemail system would remain intact, with Live Voicemail a new add-on feature that the cellular carriers could dangle in front of customers, an extra $4.99 a month. With mobile phones becoming commodities, the carriers are always desperate for new gimmicks. Why haven't they come up with this?

Blogger hipp-o thought:

cause most people arent misanthrops and answer their phone calls.

May 15, 2005 at 10:59 PM - Comment Permalink  
Anonymous merkley??? thought:

dude, i do that all the time.
just answer the phone and say:

this is ______'s answering machine, please leave a message after the beep.
then you hit any button, which makes something of a beep, and then you just listen.

you'd be surprised how well it works.

good luck.

May 16, 2005 at 3:08 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Mick thought:

merkley's solution is elegant; my luck it's a mesage I don't want to respond to immediately but has an important number in it that I can't conveniently commit to memory or paper! i guess that's why he wished us luck.

May 16, 2005 at 1:50 PM - Comment Permalink  
Anonymous kelly thought:

i was listening to a local college radio station today, and someone was talking about this same issue. they mentioned this service: http://www.callwave.com/landing/corp_wam.asp

i thought it was coincidental being i just read this in your blog ... thought about it enough to make it stick ... and agreed wholeheartedly.

i don't know about the service personally, but too much of a coincidence to not post on the blog of a total stranger whose life i read about daily.

May 18, 2005 at 1:27 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Clearing My Throat

What does a jet overhead really sound like?

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Wednesday, May 11, 2005

Mirror

Mirror 4

I often wonder why I'm fascinated by certain things; why certain images, ideas inhabit my thoughts for months, years. Take my Mirror series for example, I've made half-a-dozen posts in as many months, motivated by their refraction.

Is it because they depict the division between you and I?
Is it because they depict the distance between you and I?
Is it because they veil my identity?
Is it because they conflate my gaze and the camera's?
Is it because they represent a literal plane between public and private?
Is it because they are both a literal and figurative reflection?
Is it because they make me a ghost?
Is it because they make me a shadow?
Is it because they make me disappear?
Is it because they make me invisible?
Is it because they're about what I observe not who I am?
Is it because they strike a balance between the external and the internal?
Is it because they're about the glass we live our lives behind?
Is it because they're portals?
Is it because they're black holes?
Is it because they capture outerspace?
Is it because they capture innerspace?
Is it because they graft my camera to my head?
Is it because they filter me?
Is it because they filter you?
Is it because they cloud the issue?
Is it because they're self-portraits?
Is it because they're layered
Is it because they allow me to bounce my gaze off the glass, through my camera, through the web and onto you?

Anonymous Anonymous thought:

Magic mirror
Leon Russell
Standing by the highway suitcase by my side
No place I want to go, I just thought I'd catch a ride
Many people look my way and many pass me by
In moments of reflection, I wonder why
To the thieves I am a bandit,
the mothers think I'm a son
To the preachers I'm a sinner, Lord, I'm not the only one
To the sad ones I'm unhappy, the losers think I'm a fool
To the students I'm a teacher,
with the teachers I'm in school
To the hobos I'm imprisoned, by everything I own
To the soldiers I'm just someone else
who's dying to go home
The general sees a number. A politician's tool.
To my friends I'm just an equal in this whirlpool
Magic Mirror
Won't you tell me, please
Do I find myself in anyone I see
Magic Mirror
If we only could
Try to see ourselves as others would
To policemen I'm suspicious, it's in the way I look
I'm just another character to fingerprint and book
To the censor I'm pornography with no redeeming grace
To the hooker, I'm a customer without a face
And the sellers think I'm merchandise,
they'll have for a song
The left ones think I'm right.
The right ones think I'm wrong.
And many people come my way, and many pass me by
In my quiet reflection I wonder why
Magic Mirror
Won't you tell me, please
Do I find myself in anyone I see
Magic Mirror if we only could
Try to see ourselves as others would.

May 12, 2005 at 4:40 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Tuesday, May 10, 2005

The World Is Yours

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Monday, May 09, 2005

Overspray

Spray

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Overspray

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Andrew Mastriani's Clouds

Andy Mastriani's Cloud Magnets

Two of my most loved possessions: Miniature oil paintings of cloudy days on magnet-backed MDF by Andrew Mastriani.

He gave one or two to each of the students in Claudia Matzko's thesis; many more to friends I'm sure; all similar in tone, both visual and emotional. They've lived now on my fridges and studio doors, places I only summered and above my desk at various jobs. They live now, on the verso of our front door; something I look at on the way out everyday. A reminder of my art school days; a reminder of the paintings I wish I had bought at student prices; a reminder of the talent I conspired with; a reminder that sometimes it's the small pieces, the easy ones, that most naturally inhabit the word Art.

Blogger Andy thought:

Andy,

I'm in South Carolina at least once a year (Pawleys Island to be precise).

Should you ever find this (Google should help), please let me know. I'd love to catch up for a drink next time I'm at the shore.

I hope these years have treated you well.

My best,

A.

May 9, 2005 at 5:55 PM - Comment Permalink  
Anonymous sarah thought:

I still have two miniature paintings by Steve Keene that were part of a show we did at H. Lewis about a thousand years ago (it seems). They, too, have followed me to so many apartments and now reside along the floor boards of my bathroom floor-for the moment, at least.

Funny how one simply cannot part with such things...

May 9, 2005 at 7:52 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

Sarah,

I remember that show, fondly. I think SK has set up shop just steps around the corner from my first NY apartment. Strange how small things are sometimes.

A.

May 9, 2005 at 8:56 PM - Comment Permalink  
Anonymous sarah thought:

Nice! I remember opening up the gallery for he and his wife, who were two of the best artists we worked with. They were entirely low-pro, dropping down in a rented moving truck packed to the gills with those huge plaid, plastic shopping bags from Chinatown filled with paintings. Ahhh...MICA memories!

May 10, 2005 at 1:33 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Kandel

Kandel

I spent the greater part of Saturday assisting Aaron in his latest charitable project. His program is auctioning student artwork to prosperous alumni, and as one of the more creative class members he felt he should produce something. He arranged to photograph Dr. Eric Kandel (a legend and elder at P&S) and then draft a portrait.

Initially he envisioned a sparse and technical line drawing, so he requested a crash course in Illustrator with which he rendered a charming (yet spooky) approximation of Kandel's face. We then printed, tiled and layered it under a piece of BFK on my light table (also our kitchen island), and he began to draw. I hovered, offering foundation year pointers while he discovered that the drawing didn't want to be simple.

Hours later, Aaron had built up some healthy tone, and erased it back towards a delicate and accurate portrait. It was good, and I was proud. He should be too; after a few more hours of work he will have something worth a bid.

Blogger Mick thought:

How do I bid on this? What will it cost me?

May 9, 2005 at 2:34 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Sunday, May 08, 2005

Balloon

Anti's Balloon

Image by Anti

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Balloons

Subway Balloons - Small
Please view the full-scale image as well.

Though not immediately obvious, the mauve heart-shaped balloon reads, "Happy Mother's Day".

Mom, I hope the flowers are beautiful.

Blogger pam coulter enright thought:

They are...and, you'll be happy to know, your sister is enjoying them too (you know she can't walk past fresh flowers without taking some). She filled a little cup that fits nicely in her car cup holder.

May 9, 2005 at 8:29 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Saturday, May 07, 2005

Cleft

Blogger Pragmatik thought:

That's a great photo, Andrew:)
Is that pencil sharpener made of wood or brass? Just curious.

May 7, 2005 at 10:20 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

Thank you. It's a wooden Faber-Castell that I've had since high school. Still sharp as ever.

A.

May 9, 2005 at 8:42 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Ash

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Friday, May 06, 2005

Portal

Steps

Image by Niznoz

Blogger TRUE thought:

i love yr pics...everything about them.

May 6, 2005 at 2:38 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger hipp-o thought:

the concrete kind of looks like a pack of birth control pills.....

May 6, 2005 at 5:51 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

True,

Thanks for the props. Your thoughts are so appreciated.

I was trying to explain to a friend the other day, the nuances of my relationship with my stats; that I try to always remember that it's not about the number of eyes seeing my work, but rather the quality of eyes; that one real artist, one real critic, one real peer will always outweigh the armies of invisibles.

You are a welcome reminder of that truth.

A.

May 9, 2005 at 8:53 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Thursday, May 05, 2005

Home Life

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A Lock

The lock on the door to the private portion of the office men's room is broken. It's one of those push-button locks, embedded in the handle. Sometimes it clicks and sticks, other times it springs back, silently failing to engage.

I'd say that on average the lock functions one out of every 30 times I attempt. I know these odds, and yet I try it each and every time I enter, hoping that this time around I'll be protected from intruders that never knock. This morning it worked, and satisfyingly stuck; I can't help but think that a day of good fortune will follow.

Blogger pam coulter enright thought:

If Hen were home, he'd tell you to play the lottery (or at least look for some associated number).

May 5, 2005 at 1:30 PM - Comment Permalink  
Anonymous Tim thought:

He's not. So just enjoy the fact that you don't idolize bathrooms like dad...

May 5, 2005 at 4:24 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger hipp-o thought:

it's what bf skinner called "intermittent reinforcement".
ooh - and this is especially for andy - bf skinner did all of his research on....































PIGEONS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Run piegeons, run, here comes andy....

May 6, 2005 at 5:50 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

You're the one who should run. He did much of his work training pigeons to...





























...guide air-dropped munitions to their targets (so, watch out for my swarm of pigeon-brained smart bombs!).

The principle worked ridiculously well. In fact, the Coast Guard now uses pigeons mounted in bubbles under helicopters to help identify people lost as sea. The pigeons' ability to visually discriminate amongst crowded fields (like the frothy Atlantic) FAR exceeds our own.

Skinner also dabbled in brain washing and utopianism. Interesting chap.

A.

May 9, 2005 at 9:13 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Tuesday, May 03, 2005

Leftovers

Blogger hipp-o thought:

i think this would cost at least $75 at nobu.

May 6, 2005 at 5:52 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Mirror

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I Miss LA Man

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Sunday, May 01, 2005

A Day In The Life Of

My contribution to Flickr's A Day In The Life Image Pool. The idea behind the DILO Group, is that on a predetermined day (regularly a solstice or equinox, but in this case May 1st), all of the members (about 1700) document their day photographically and then post their 5 best images to the image pool, essentially creating a global, multi-faceted, shared memory of the day.

I began mine with many loads of laundry:

DILO 1 - Hangers - Small
Please view the full-scale image as well.

DILO 2 - Sheets - Small
Please view the full-scale image as well.

And ended it with a brisk walk around the neighborhood.

DILO 3 - Safety Glass - Small
Please view the full-scale image as well.

DILO 4 - Powder - Small
Please view the full-scale image as well.

DILO 5 - Covert - Small
Please view the full-scale image as well.

Anonymous Anonymous thought:

Glad to see that Hethr has the same attitude towards mens shirts as mamajama - send 'em to the laundry!

May 6, 2005 at 11:24 AM - Comment Permalink  

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