The Treehouse + The Cave


The Treehouse + The Cave: January 2005 <body><script type="text/javascript"> function setAttributeOnload(object, attribute, val) { if(window.addEventListener) { window.addEventListener('load', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }, false); } else { window.attachEvent('onload', function(){ object[attribute] = val; }); } } </script> <div id="navbar-iframe-container"></div> <script type="text/javascript" src="https://apis.google.com/js/plusone.js"></script> <script type="text/javascript"> gapi.load("gapi.iframes:gapi.iframes.style.bubble", function() { if (gapi.iframes && gapi.iframes.getContext) { gapi.iframes.getContext().openChild({ url: 'https://www.blogger.com/navbar.g?targetBlogID\x3d9561264\x26blogName\x3dThe+Treehouse+%2B+The+Cave\x26publishMode\x3dPUBLISH_MODE_BLOGSPOT\x26navbarType\x3dBLACK\x26layoutType\x3dCLASSIC\x26searchRoot\x3dhttp://thetreehouseandthecave.blogspot.com/search\x26blogLocale\x3den_US\x26v\x3d2\x26homepageUrl\x3dhttp://thetreehouseandthecave.blogspot.com/\x26vt\x3d455617431721372491', where: document.getElementById("navbar-iframe-container"), id: "navbar-iframe" }); } }); </script>

Monday, January 31, 2005

The Pigeon Wars

Brooklyn Pigeons

I don't know how I missed Pitchaya Sudbanthad's excellent story about the culture of pigeon keeping in Brooklyn that ran in The Morning News back in August. If you're as interested in the autonomous clouds of pigeons that are ever-present above most New York City neighborhoods as I am, it's a must read.

Blogger heather thought:

this dude's online journal (an oxymoron in and of itself) may have some big names writing for it, but his article for the morning news is a far cry from excellent. it reads like a feature in a college newspaper--one trek to the ghetto mixed with a little book learnen and no effort on the writer's part to integrate the words of sources with his own. he seems afraid of his interview subjects, unsure how to negotiate their language. he netiher capitalizes on nor alleviates his outsider status with them.

February 2, 2005 at 2:48 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

I meant excellent in a "he's writing 'bout pigeons in Brooklyn, I like pigeons, I like Brooklyn" kinda way.

Wasn't really attempting to tear it apart. I'm glad you did though, there are definitely shady overtones of cultural tourism...

A.

February 2, 2005 at 3:15 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Personal Compression

Since Saturday morning I've been wearing a shirt/jacket that I hadn't pulled from my closet in a couple years. I had forgotten how much I like it, though I'm still not sure how it's meant to be worn.

It's a somewhat rave-inspired (think Berlin '99) black brushed-cotton windbreaker with more zippers, snaps and adjustable elastics than necessary. While choosing (for an extended period of time, in front of our antique mirror) how to wear it today, I figured out why I like it so much. Once you understand all of the different adjustments you can make, and how they affect the fit of the garment, it's remarkably easy to make this thing fit perfectly.

Even better, it's easy to make it snug. For whatever reason (some attribute it to mild autism) I love my clothes to exert a mild and consistent pressure on my body. In other words, I prefer them considerably tighter than my average peer. This desire for personal compression affects more than my attire.

I like my shoes tied tightly, with precisely equal pressure applied to each foot. I like my seat belt tight, reminding me that I'm a human, in a container, traveling through space much faster than I should be. I like the wrap around my wrist taut enough to make that creaking leather sound when I bend it.

Related: Deep Pressure

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Quotations

"The best way to predict the future is to invent it." - Alan Kay

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Sunday, January 30, 2005

Right

The dawning of the Conceptual Age? I hope so.

Blogger Paige thought:

i loved that article.

i want to turn it into a manifesto, for either my faculty or my..self.

thanks :)

January 31, 2005 at 6:44 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Thermometer

Bustelo

We wisely opted to paint the floor of Heather's studio with oil-based paint. Which meant that we had to clean our brushes with mineral spirits. I emptied a coffee can into a baggie and used the empty can to rinse our tools and fingertips. Because it took us a week to paint it (each coat took 24 hours to dry, and it took 4 coats), we've had the can full of milky solvents for a while now.

What's interesting is that the vapor above the polluted liquid in the can must expand and contract within the exact same temperature range as our loft. About fifteen minutes after we give up on layering and turn on our expensive heat, the can makes a distinctive "bloop" popping sound. It makes a similar sound 20 or 30 minutes after we turn of the heat, as the can contracts. Like clockwork.

Blogger hipp-o thought:

how fun! i can just imagine the anticipation of the pop.

you've discovered the low specific heat and high vapor pressure of organic solvents. the low specific heat allows the liquid and gas temperature to fluctuate with the temperature of the apartment with ease (as opposed to water with its brilliantly high specific heat which lags whatever temperature the apartment is at by many hours). the increase in temperature causes three things:

1) the liquid will expand
2) the amount of gas increases (like steam when boiling water)
3) the gas will have more kinetic energy (like little kamakazi planes attacking the sides of the cans with more and more force)

PV=nRT (pressure x volume= moles x gasconstant x temperature). so you are increasing both T (the temperature) and n (the numbers of moles of gas you have), causing an explosive growth of either pressure or volume. since it is a contained system, the volume stays the same and pressure rises. eventually the pressure rises to the point that it distends the cap, causing an increase in volume until the pressure and volume have reached a happy consensus with one another. some of the pressure will also be relieved in making that satisfying POP!

January 31, 2005 at 10:41 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Mick thought:

Aaron has belabored the explanation to the point that even I would be proud! That said, it is the fact that the volume of gas expans and contracts a lot with a little temperature and this is flexing the can and making it pop. It will eventually cease to make noise as the metal fatiques. Bye-the-bye...I'd like to see a good rendition of the new floor.

January 31, 2005 at 12:59 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Paige thought:

that just made me really crave the smell of mineral spirits....

January 31, 2005 at 6:37 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

I love the smell of solvents too. So does my mom, so maybe it makes sense.

I've used them all and know them all be scent (don't worry, it's a product of my education, I was a printmaking major).

Xylene is my favorite. That, or Hancolite, which has been scarce for years (though a litho professor of mine kept a 5 gallon can of it squirreled away under his desk).

A.

January 31, 2005 at 11:44 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger hipp-o thought:

I am sure mick is the ultimate expert on the wonder of organic solvents, I want to hear his tales :)

I remember my days in orgo lab, I had a little trick - I used to keep a flask of acetone on my bench near my hood at all times, so in case I got a whiff of something particulary nasty, I could grab the flask of acetone and it would clear it right out, as well as resurface the memories of my mom with an aqua-green foam toe-separator wedged between her digits, wetting cotton balls with an upside down bottle of rite aid nail polish remover while watching days of our lives.

February 1, 2005 at 11:22 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Saturday, January 29, 2005

Exhaling

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Stowaways

Protozoa

Sometimes when I look at an empty bright blue sky, I instinctively shift my focus from the height of the absent clouds to just micrometers above each eye. I can somehow focus on the thin layer of Lacrimal Fluid surrounding my eyes, and in it I can see the ghostly outlines of active microorganisms swimming around in my tears.

I mentioned this to Aaron (my biology lifeline since the 10th grade and current medical student), who admitted to having seen them as well, but suggested that they might be lint rather than protozoa. My sister agrees they are alive however, and has corroborated me, stating that she tends to "watch the 'worms' in oncoming headlights".

Experienced this?

Blogger Mick thought:

Yes, an(n)oy, took my place briefly when I was to lazy to sign in! As for the stowaways...they are there but they are not alive!

January 30, 2005 at 12:00 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger bruk thought:

im gonna try that out. wormies in the eyes. i wanna see that.

January 30, 2005 at 5:52 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

Please do.
Report back.

A.

January 30, 2005 at 7:05 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger hipp-o thought:

aaron here, in addition to "gunk" (lint, etc.) i imagine there is a fair amount of cellular debris that you might be seeing. the organic nature of this material might be why you think its "alive" or even "wiggling" though the wiggling is probably nothing more that the wiggling a tissue would do when submerged in water (ie, lacrimal fluid). a

January 31, 2005 at 10:44 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger hipp-o thought:

ok - IVE GOT THE ANSWER!

They are called "floaters". They are indeed cellular debris, but they are NOT in the lacrimal fluid, but rather in the vitreous humour of the eyeball (the jello like substance in the main chamber of the eyeball). There are tons of websites, even clubs, about floaters, with some renderings as well, so check it out :)

February 1, 2005 at 11:14 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

I LOVE that they're called Floaters! So simple, so appropriate.

A.

February 1, 2005 at 12:15 PM - Comment Permalink  
Anonymous Deeter thought:

Oh squiggly line in my eye fluid. I see you lurking there on the peripheral of my vision.

But when I try to look at you, you scurry away.

Are you shy, squiggly line?

Why only when I ignore you, do you return to the center of my eye?

Oh, squiggly line, it's alright, you are forgiven.

- Stewie from Family Guy

March 16, 2008 at 6:17 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Orotones

Orotones

Images by Edward S. Curtis

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Midair

Jamie's Balloons

Image by Jamie Boud

Blogger Andy thought:

Someone must have been having a babyshower on Halloween.

A.

January 29, 2005 at 10:13 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger hipp-o thought:

do you think they caught on the way up, or on the way down?

January 31, 2005 at 10:48 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

Hard to say. They look pretty nestled in there, as though they were placed on purpose.

I'm gonna risk it and say that they got caught goin' up. They seem happier that way. Balloons are meant to rise until they're invisible, not descend and become yet more latex litter.

A.

January 31, 2005 at 12:39 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Friday, January 28, 2005

Balloons

Balloons
Please view the first and second full-scale images as well.

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Thursday, January 27, 2005

Weathercube

Weather Cube 2

Have I mentioned that I can get the police band on this thing?

"Male in jersey headed southbound on Atlantic."

Blogger Mick thought:

That's to protect you from running afoul of the weather!

January 29, 2005 at 6:02 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

Welcome back Mick. You had an impersonator called Anonymous for a while there. Heather will be happy to see that you're alive.

A.

January 29, 2005 at 8:53 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger spencer thought:

now, what is that thing?

January 31, 2005 at 9:39 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger mshood thought:

My God, my grandfather had one of those. It sat on the kitchen table next to his favorite chair. Kickin'.

February 2, 2005 at 1:23 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

The Weathercube is a small tabletop radio (sold by RadioShack in the 80's) that can tune in frequencies within the Public Service Band.

Wherever you live in the U.S. you're within range of a transmitter that broadcasts weather information 24 hours a day. The Weathercube was designed to be a simple radio that picks up and plays that information. You simply depress the single off-white button on its upper edge, and you hear the forecast.

What's cool about it (besides the minimal, retro aesthetic) is that in highly populated areas, you can pick up a lot of other broadcasts. Most notably in New York: car services, bike messengers, EMTs, and cops.

A.

February 2, 2005 at 3:08 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Container

Rubbish

In December 2004, Holger Beisitzer sold plastic grocery bags filled with helium at a German Christmas market as components of a piece called Flying Rubbish. This beautiful work succinctly discusses issues of both sustainability and artistic value. By taking seemingly worthless objects and modifying them only through the introduction of an invisible and nearly weightless gas, Beisitzer has asked the public to pay only for the artistic gesture itself, repurposing the bags as containers for an idea rather than physical commodities. Elegant.

Via Near Near Future

Related: George Kuchar's floating plastic bag and Sam Mendes' knock-off version.

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Negative Six

Apparantly, most people deal with the cold much more poorly than I do.

They complain, oblivious to the fact that the weather just is. They slow down, as though their physical and mental energy is directly proportional to the thermal energy in the air (or perhaps the amount of skin seen on city streets). They pile on unnecessarily oversized garments and huddle around illegal ceramic heaters under their desks, desperately calling Facilities Management to request that the office heat be raised. They shamelessly decry New York, opting to applaud softer, sandier locales.

I like the cold. I like that it hardens my shell and allows me to walk tautly and briskly past shivering women with high heels in paper bags. I like that it interiorizes my thoughts in a way that summer can't. I like protecting my ears with headphones, protecting my lungs with a cigarette, and thinking to myself: "I've fallen through a frozen pond, and waded out casually, breaking pieces of ice with my fists to clear a narrow path. This is easy."

Anonymous Anonymous thought:

"protecting your lungs?" HUH? LUV U!

January 27, 2005 at 3:22 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger hipp-o thought:

yeah, i second that, protecting your lungs, HA! cold weather exacerbates airway disease, so let's see how the cold treats ya post-emphysema.

i think youve missed a major point here also.
there is a whole group of us that love the cold.
i really do - neater clothes, snow, etc.

but its the damn lack of sunlight.
i miss the sun, magnificent little feller that he is.
to me, winter seems a step closer to death.
though there are bacteria at the north pole.

January 31, 2005 at 10:55 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Wednesday, January 26, 2005

Expanding Cluster

Cluster

Blogger hipp-o thought:

if i eat these, will i........you know.. ;) ?

January 26, 2005 at 11:40 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger mike thought:

Vey cool. almost looks like it is in motion.

January 28, 2005 at 9:08 PM - Comment Permalink  

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The Frozen Shore

Witold

Image by Witold Riedel

Blogger Paige thought:

eee hee hee heee!

(i hope he's not stuck!)

January 26, 2005 at 5:59 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Quotations

"Boredom is always counter-revolutionary. Always." - Guy Debord

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Phosphenes

Phosphenes Leonids

When I was 5 or 6 I discovered what I wouldn't know was the phenomenon of phosphenes until the age of 14.

After I was put to bed, I'd lie awake with the palms of my small hands applying firm pressure to each closed eye. Patterns of deeply saturated color (reminiscent of fireworks or fireflies) would fill what had been my central and peripheral fields of vision. Initially I would watch, critical and entertained, enjoying the novelty of a personal light show. However, over time I began to allow myself to sink into these visions. I would look past that primary layer, towards the receding blackness rather than the dancing light.

I got good at it, and by the time I was 8 or 9, I was able to completely loose awareness of myself as a viewer, as body lying in bed. Using this method I cultivated minor out of body experiences for much of my youth. I always felt very comfortable, being just a mind and eyes.

Then, one day I was unable to achieve this absence. As an adult I tend to think that I lost it as soon as I comprehended the physical nature of the phenomena itself. Though to be honest, I think I lost the skill gradually, as my interest in defining the parameters of reality moved on to other aspects of my life. I miss it, though I still keep the company of the colors.

Images: The 2001 Leonids

Blogger Rob thought:

http://robwilliamsblog.blogspot.com/2005/06/seeing-is-easy-with-eyes-closed.html

great post,

Just found it, please check my similar post out above :)

could I please use your pictures of the leonids as an example of what you have used as an analogy to what you see?

June 23, 2005 at 1:43 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

Rob,

Thanx for your thoughts. I'm impressed by your attempt to depict the virtually invisible. Nice feedback from the forums as well; to which did you post?

You can of course link, cite, copy whatever from my post, just give me credit. Also know that I nicked those Leonid images from Spaceweather.com, I didn't (and couldn't) shoot them myself.

A.

June 24, 2005 at 9:00 AM - Comment Permalink  
Anonymous martin thought:

hello andy!

what you wrote at the end is kind of funny because it reminds me of the pink floyd song "comfortly numb" which has the following lyrics in it: ".... when i was a child i caught a fleeting glimpse, out of the corner of my eye, i turned to look but it was gone i cannot put my finger on it now... ".

anyway, currently i'm interested in generating these things you see and what you and rob posted and blogged definately helped.
... my first try (from months ago and until now the only try) to picture one shape-thing you see: http://www.8ung.at/mrtn/fotos/works/thingsyousee.jpg

please let me know what you think.

greetings

martin

June 27, 2006 at 6:40 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

Martin,

I've been working on trying to depict this experience as well, check out these two posts (Deep Field, Constellation).

Enjoyed yours,

A.

July 2, 2006 at 9:48 PM - Comment Permalink  
Anonymous martin thought:

wow, these two are amazing! don't know how you did it, also didn't read the text because got not much time now but will check it out later!

thanks!

m.

July 3, 2006 at 5:47 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Monday, January 24, 2005

Trees

I think Terra's on to something, suggesting a shift from birds to trees, one of my other iconic fascinations. A fascination that I know is sure to resonate with Mick as much as the birds have.

I lived in Connecticut for four years when I was in late grade school/junior high, and my memories of the period are marked by one tree in particular. Standing in the middle of West Mountain Road (where it T's with Cherry Brook), was a beautiful oak (maybe an ash?) nearly 4 feet in diameter.

Living nearly at the crest of West Mountain we had to drive past the tree every time we left our house (to the right on the way up, to the left on the way down). It became a gate of sorts, signaling to us each time we returned from a roadtrip or errand, and to guests following handwritten directions, that it was only minutes to our home.

Blogger heather thought:

i started an essay a few months ago (that, as usual, was abandoned in favor of more time in and around bed) about all the trees i have loved. but my first arboreal love--the one i lost my tree vee to--was actually dead.

it was on my grandparents' property, a sort of tree museum in its own right. they were as serious about them as they were birds (which they tagged and counted for the west virginia state bird census). my granddaddy couldn't bring himself to remove this fallen soldier, thinking it disrespectful to the dead. besides, it posed no threat, as a line of other, upright trees held it back from tumbling down the hillside into their house. we played all kinds of games on it, hiding behind it, using it as a balance beam, picking bugs out of it.

even he didn't know what kind of tree it was, i don't think, but not knowing it right now seems a little like having forgotten your third grade bestbest friend's name.

January 24, 2005 at 6:29 PM - Comment Permalink  
Anonymous Anonymous thought:

...twas an Oak, methinks.

LUV U

January 24, 2005 at 9:05 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger heather thought:

stop posting anonymously, daddy! it's weird.

January 24, 2005 at 9:39 PM - Comment Permalink  

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White Fireflies

Balloon Lamp

Kyouei's Balloon Lamp is a simple and inspired object. Arguably just a latex lantern sans cord, the Balloon Lamp could become so much more. Modified with a Lithium-Coin battery, the illumination provided by the LED can last up to 100 hours. Now imagine substituting the breath used to fill its volume with helium. You'd have a floating, ghostly orb perfect for stringing around a pool during a summer party. Alternatively, (environmental concerns aside) I'd definitely want to see thousands of these set loose on a still night. White fireflies on a macro scale.

Via Sensory Impact

Related: AfroditiKrassa's World View Lamp which will be put on the market by Innermost.

Blogger hipp-o thought:

no need to stop at white either, though i do appreciate the elegance in its simplicity. perhaps this will spark a new wave of night-balloon flying.

just don't perform the experiment during any major avian migratory seasons, MamaJama might get upset.

January 24, 2005 at 1:28 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Morning Sunlight

Prisms

It's been a little over a month now since the Winter Solstice, and I'm beginning to see the difference in the light every morning. Two weeks ago I was leaving for work just as the sun was coming over the chimneys and skylights of the adjacent rowhouses. These days, sunlight has a good five minutes to start passing through our prisms before I lock the door.

Prisms have hung in every bedroom I've had since I was in the fifth grade. There's just something about a silent process creating such pure forms. Our cats love them too, chasing each little rainbow like a phosphorescent rat.

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Sunday, January 23, 2005

Lighting Tints

Bulbs Spooning

While setting up my Senior Thesis Exhibition three and a half years ago, I stumbled upon an interior design idea that I've used ever since. If you replace a standard lightbulb in an incandescent fixture with a Bug Lite bulb, the space illuminated instantly becomes the coziest, warmest, most inviting part of your home. You'll want to smoke some opium, make some coffee, watch Twin Peaks and then make out until you fall asleep. Perfect for frozen days like these.

A slight twist I tried a year or two later: Soft Pink bulbs. They do everything they say they will, calming a room with minimal visual change.

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Snowstorm

Snowstorm

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Saturday, January 22, 2005

Orange Julius Recipe

So, listen to this. Because of the blizzard, Heather decided to make her favorite veggie chili. We had trouble finding the recipe though, as our cookbooks and recipes haven't really found a home yet; they live in a box beside the fridge. As I flipped through one of them, glancing at all the folded papers and index cards crammed between its pages, I found this:

Recipe
Please view the full image as well.

A recipe for an Orange Julius! If it's any good, I'm set (as soon as I get a blender).

Anonymous Anonymous thought:

This is Nina Darnell's handwriting of long ago. She was MamaJama's friend and associate at Shawnee Hills in the mid eighties.
LUV U

January 22, 2005 at 8:45 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger bruk thought:

veggie chili. yumm. i always get the best recipes off the net. endless amounts available.

stay warm in the blizzard, eh.

January 23, 2005 at 8:32 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Yoko Devereaux

YokoD

Yoko Devereaux launched their new website yesterday.

I've known the folks behind the label for a while now, and let me say, they're just as amazing as their clothes. If you're fed up with the fact that nobody makes decent, edgy menswear (that isn't eurotrash), then you're in luck. Yoko D. combine fine tailoring, conceptual thinking and highly street-conscious accents to make items I've consistently drooled over, season after season. Support them.

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Friday, January 21, 2005

Sunset Buttons

Sunset Pins
Please view the full-scale image as well.

In 2002, I was going to sell these buttons at a friend's store, but after making a few, determined that my button machine was sub-par. I ended up writing a book for her instead.

My dad's the only person who ever got one.

Anonymous Anonymous thought:

May I have one (with water)?
-LUV U

January 21, 2005 at 10:24 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Lost Balloons

Lost Balloons

A cluster of lost balloons. I saw them on the way to work today.

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XML Music Registries

MusicMobs

XML registries are a brilliant idea. It basically goes like this:

You export an XML file from your audio player that contains all of the metadata from every song in your music collection. It's really just a light-weight database that contains a list of all your artists, all your albums and all your songs. It knows how many Pavement albums you have, and that you've listened to Bows and Arrows more than any other album. It knows how often you've played, and how you've rated, each track in your library.

You then setup an account with an online registry, and upload your XML file. Every 4 Gigs of music you have accounts for about 1 Meg of XML data, so be warned, it can take a while. For instance, my collection which weighs in at about 53 Gigs, generates a 14 Meg XML file. Once the registry receives your XML and parses it, there are a lot of really interesting things you can do with that data.

Musicmobs has taken the power of your own listening history and applied it to the concept of social networking. Basically, it knows your taste in music and is able to accurately suggest other people that have similar taste. It's a great way to discover new music, and other people who are into the same shit you are.

As an extension to it's online interface, Musicmobs has created Mobster, an OSX app that runs alongside iTunes that automates the whole process. It can handle the upload procedure for you and it will suggest other artists to check out. What makes it really clever though, is the Hipster to Mainstream slider.

Because it knows the specific tastes of thousands of people, their system is able to see which artists are the most popular and which are enjoyed only by folks out on the end of the bell curve. What the slider does is allow you to filter in real time, the suggestions it's making, based on whether the system views a given artists as being Mainstream or Hipster. Brilliant.

A few other concepts that are equally compelling:

Audioscrobbler, an audio player plug-in that does pretty much the same thing, the only difference is that your remote database is updated every time you play a song, as opposed to manually uploading periodically.

The Internet iTunes Registry, will tell you "More than you ever wanted to know about what you listen to." It's claim to fame is that it can generate a million different charts, visually showing you your listening habits.

Last.fm, isn't based on XML, but it is in similar territory. Their master plan is to create internet radio that is tailor made for each listener. They figure: if their system knows what you like, and it can find other people that share your taste, and it knows of tracks that they love, but you don't have yet, then it's pretty easy for it to give each listener a constant stream of music they haven't heard but will probably like. Genius.

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Thursday, January 20, 2005

Ketchup Packets

Packets

Ketchup packets are poorly conceived. They don't contain enough ketchup, and when you do try to harvest what little Heinz they hold, you can only ever squeeze half out. It's such a waste of ketchup.

Why doesn't ketchup come in creamer cups? The kind with the thin plastic shell and foil peel-away top. They would hold a lot more ketchup; it would be a lot easier to squeeze out; and it is a fucking cup in which to dip your French fries (a la the pleated paper cups at Wendy's). You could get every last bit of ketchup if you wanted, using your French fry as a tool, like a chimp. It would be so much better.

I know I'm promoting disposable plastic, but it couldn't be much worse than the current packets, right?

Blogger Timothy Ryan Enright thought:

This change in ketchup packet design is very important to me, and I support you 100% in your journey to create a better one. However, what if ketchup came in just bigger packets. Just double the size, it would still be wasteful yes, but I would no longer need 300 to finish my burger and fries.

January 21, 2005 at 12:11 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

You are correct, it would be nice to use 15 packets instead of 30 per periodic fast-food binge.

However, even with packets that hold twice the volume, you're still wasting about the same amount of ketchup. That's not even to mention an argument I left out of my initial post, which is the cleanliness factor.

One of my biggest issues with the packets is that, as you tear them open, you're pretty much guaranteed to get ketchup on your hands. If you survive that step, you have to avoid a mess when you squeeze it out, and then again as you clean up whatever surface you squeezed the ketchup onto in the first place.

With the creamer cups, you'd never have to touch ketchup, and you wouldn't even have to remove the ketchup from the cup if you didn't want to. The only messy part is the circle of foil you'd peel away as you open the cup. They're infinitely cleaner.

A.

January 21, 2005 at 9:28 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger hipp-o thought:

i like the creamer pack idea.

first, we all know that the wendy's ketchup cups are one of the many reasons why dining there is infintely better than drive-through(excuse me, drive-thru) or god forbid, eating at mcdonalds (though some mcd's have stolen wendy's idea).

all of the eateries that delivered my daily sustenance while i was a sad, sad investment banker at 388 greenwich street figured this out too. they were all competing for all those banker $20 dinner orders, and the good eateries decided to fuck the packets and include plastic tubs of ketchup with handy lids - just like mexican eateries deliver sour cream. mass producing these - ie, the creamer idea - is a good one.

love hipp-o

ps.
if you assume the amount of ketchup wasted in a packet is relative to its surface area rather than its volume, the larger packets tim proposes would reduce the amount of ketchup wasted, as volume increases (length)^3 vs. (length)^2 for surface area. its the same reason why a human cell can only grow so large, at some point the amount of plasma membrane available for diffusion is too small to support the more faster increasing volume of the cell, leaving the center devoid of needed nutrients.

January 23, 2005 at 2:24 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Forms thought:

Thats a great idea. I am sure it would save space when shipping the ketchup as well.

January 23, 2005 at 6:46 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Sarah thought:

I just stumbled upon your blog and I'm addicted.

As for the ketchup factor, I couldn't agree more. My problem is I'm one of those eat-while-you-drive types. And those packets are not at all conducive to this reckless way of life. When I get fries from Wendy's, I always go inside and I always pump a little pleated cup of ketchup , balancing it on one knee or in an empty cupholder or something while I eat & drive. You can't do that with the packets. Sometimes I contemplate using the bag it all came in, but generally I avoid that since I need the bag for trash at the end and it would be way too messy.

Ahh... the complexities of fast-food life.

January 24, 2005 at 4:18 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Jeremy thought:

they work a little better if you tear off the edge completely. sometimes that torn edge gets in the way. i'm writing a blog about it now. blogfeelingz.blogspot.com

December 21, 2008 at 7:33 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Orange Julius

Julius

I'm convinced the most delicious beverage ever invented is the Orange Julius. If you spoke with anyone I know, they'd tell you that I love the shit. I've made road trips to dying malls just to get a large.

Unfortunately for us all, they're going extinct. In three of the places I've lived, I've watched as the local mall aborted its Orange Julius. The closest franchise is 16.95 miles away. What the fuck?

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Fields

Fields

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Scaled Perspective

Unlike many I know, I still get excited to fly. I love airports with their dated attempts at modernity. I love planes, of all kinds, it doesn't really matter to me if their from Cessna or the Skunkworks. But what I really love, and what I anxiously await each time I'm in a Town Car driving up the BQE, is the perspective I gain for the minutes I'm in the sky.

There's something about the shift in scale itself that allows for both personal and systemic insight. While I'm aloft, an awareness of how rare and productive those minutes can be is never absent. I've had some of my best ideas staring out of an acrylic porthole at the shimmer of human progress, and I take full advantage of that altitude every chance I get.

Consequently, I'm a total asshole about which seat I get. Fighting for a window seat is a given (it should be noted at this point as well, that Heather, for many years, has generously conceded to sitting on the aisle).

What I get picky about is the side of the plane I'm on and my proximity to the wing (there's nothing worse than walking onto the plane behind a couple of haggard old ladies and a young couple, litter in tow, only to discover that my seat is above the wing and my view will begin and end staring at worn rivets).

Before booking my tickets, I mentally map the flight path, assessing which side might have the superior view. For instance, if I'm flying down the East Coast, I'll opt for the right-hand side, providing views of organically forking rivers and crowded malls rather than less stimulating, though still calmly beautiful, sea. If I'm headed home, I go with whichever seat lets me watch the post-Verrazano harbor fade into Lower Manhattan.

For those that enjoy looking down as much as I do, download Idle Time's wonderful screensaver, Holding Pattern.

Blogger spencer thought:

i love to fly.
love it.
i take pictures out the window on every plane i have ever been on.

also, i love your blog.

January 26, 2005 at 4:26 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Wednesday, January 19, 2005

Glowing

Lights

Heather found these on Thorsten Van Elten, and I think the designers had a vision of our apartment when they made them. They're perfect.

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Believe

Believe

Even though I've gotten back into indie rock over the years, there are still moments in which I wish I were 19 and had an MDMA tolerance again.

Listening to track 3, Believe (featuring Kele Okereke (frontman of Bloc Party)), on the Chemical Brothers' new LP Push the Button for the first time was one of those moments. This tune could destroy a Phazon Soundsystem.

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Breaker Painter

Power Panel

The simplest thing I've ever done to beautify my home was to spraypaint my breaker panel. It's virtually free (if you're the kind of person with spraypaint around), and it makes an immeasurable impact on the visual order of your space. I promise.

A tip: to give the screws a nice even coat of paint as well, punch them through a piece of cardboard until their heads are flush with the surface of the board, and then spray.

Blogger Mick thought:

..."our" home?

January 19, 2005 at 6:04 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Mick thought:

Meant to say-"I really like the colors-very nice; good spray paint tip also..."home"...?

January 19, 2005 at 6:14 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger heather thought:

so i'm reading my dad's post chastizing andy for leaving me out of coveted and venerable breaker box/apartment ownership, and i'm thinking, "wow. this shit's fucked up. my dad's got a blog, my boyfriend's got a blog, and they're all over each other about all kinds of weirdness. jaime thinks daddy's old-man stylings are 'hilarious' (see the nyu technograff or whatevertheshirt from monday), mom thinks it's awesome that daddy's got something to do, and daddy loves reading andy's autistic brain on a monitor."

meanwhile, i'm lurking all over the place while my property rights are debated in the bloggo-nano-techno-ono-band. time to get one of these blogger accounts, i guess. i refresh the page to refresh my memory, and dad's got a *second* post re: ownership, this time clarifying that he's really interested in whether a rented apartment can be a home.

point is, i'm a sucker and can't stay away from the pressing questions of our time, no matter how much i wish i could.

January 19, 2005 at 6:44 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Mick thought:

Sorry HLS and Andy...I knew I blew it...I'll refrain. LUV U Both

January 19, 2005 at 9:18 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Fabian thought:

Just stopped by, that's a great idea about the painting of the breaker panel...I'm off to paint.

January 19, 2005 at 9:24 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

January 19, 2005 at 9:53 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Tuesday, January 18, 2005

Space

Blogger Miss K Risque thought:

i love this idea, the doors with paintings on them... great

January 19, 2005 at 12:58 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

The pieces on the doors are made out of wheat-pasted cut paper. They're by Swoon (as this is an image of her studio), and they are wonderful.

Check out more of her work either by taking a walk around New York, or by visiting her website.

A.

January 19, 2005 at 8:07 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Seagulls vs. Pigeons

Vs

Growing up, I never lived in a place that had seagulls. Of course, I had seen them at the beach on vacation, and above landfills on TV. But I never once thought that they might hang out on top of street lights or parked trucks, the way pigeons do.

So when I moved to Baltimore and then Brooklyn, it always startled me to catch seagulls in my peripheral vision. They're so much bigger and faster than the pigeons that I can't help but root for the pigeons. I imagine them competing for the prime French fry spots in some sort of inner-city turf war.

Blogger Paige thought:

Toronto also has a delightful mix of seagulls and pigeons. When I was working downtown all summer I would eat lunch outside and the seaguls would always try and swoop down to steal the food from the innocent pigeons I enjoyed feeding. They are like poachers.

Sometimes I fed the seagulls too, but only the cute ones.

January 19, 2005 at 4:15 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

I've seen a seagull snatch an entire cloud of cotton candy (conical paper stick and all) out of a child's hand. They're shady bastards.

A.

January 19, 2005 at 5:24 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Seeking Stasis

Scraped Bowl

I got desperate this week. Anti, you understand.

Blogger J thought:

yes, sir... i do.

January 18, 2005 at 6:26 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

It's amazing how far this can carry you, isn't it...

A.

January 19, 2005 at 9:04 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Monday, January 17, 2005

Grafedia

Grafedia

The thing I love most about the developments emerging from NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program lately (e.g. Pac-Manhattan), is that they're all heavily influenced by the street. They aren't lofty proof-of-concept articles, nor are they prototypes clearly designed to win the hearts of venture capitalists. They're technologies that real people can understand, interpret and participate in, the entire time with two feet planted firmly on dirty asphalt. I like to think it's the influence of The City itself.

The latest nugget of genius to hatch at the ITP is John Geraci's Grafedia. It's basically a way for the average city dweller to encounter hyperlinks, written on walls, as they navigate the five boroughs. An initial user can post media content to the system, and then write (in blue, with an underline) a hyperlink to their posted content on any surface.

When a second user encounters the link (it might be the word hum, though it could be any word or series of words the initial user chooses) they can send an email or text message from their phone to hum@grafedia.net. A few seconds later the piece of media originally posted to the system is sent to the viewer.

The system has many, many possible uses. The first that came to my mind was that we can now tag tags with metadata. Allowing the casual fan of graffiti to quickly download information about the artist, when the piece was put up, what materials it employed, etc. Consider it the open-source, networked version of gallery placards for the street.

Via Rhizome

Blogger Mick thought:

This is true participatory genius...remarkable that we can find the where-with-all to support such powerful work.

January 17, 2005 at 8:03 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Jamie thought:

That's hilarious.

By the way, judging from a picture you posted a little while ago, I think you might live right down the block from me.

January 17, 2005 at 9:26 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Saturday, January 15, 2005

Remaining Items

Heather and I went through our very last box. Five and a half months in, we are done moving. Here are the things we agreed I could keep (if I was willing to stash them away in my studio):

Weather Cube
A Realistic Weathercube.

Mousetraps
Modified mousetraps that I had been using as organizational clips at our old place. I removed the latch mechanism, drilled some holes (so I could screw them into the wall) and then gave them a coat of polyurethane. They worked well (we used to store unpaid bills in them)—we just don't have a place for them now.

Lock
An old lock that my mom brought back from Utah as a gift for some reason I never quite understood.

Dinosaurs
Scale models (made in 1974) of an Iguanodon and a Diplodocus from the British Museum of Natural History. I've had them since I was a child.

Colibri
A broken Colibri lighter that Heather bought in Baltimore's Inner Harbor when we were in school.

Horseshoe
One of the horseshoes that Heather's mom sent us as a housewarming present when we took our last apartment.

Die
The front-cover die from the hardcover edition of my book.

Butterfly Angel
A piece by Andrew Sutherland.

Blogger Mick thought:

I will never get moved in; especially if I think my weather cube or my horse shoe were at risk! The Sal Val has received many of my precioussssssss...

January 16, 2005 at 7:08 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Paige thought:

your collection of fabulous things has inspired me to collect more interesting items... (not that i need encouragement to be more of a pack rat!)

the mousetrap clips are ultimatly cool though, i really want some...

January 16, 2005 at 9:59 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

To clarify: Heather didn't threaten to throw away any of this shit, she's got a sizable pile of her own (owl figurines, seashells, picture frames, ceramic miniatures, turtle shells, snowglobes, etc.) to squirrel away.

I love collections of objects like this. For one serendipitous reason or another these objects coalesced, forming wonderful portraits of each of us.

A.

January 17, 2005 at 12:39 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger pam coulter enright thought:

Ok...since I see Mick posting stuff, I feel obligated to respond too. Since when do I need a reason for giving a cool gift? It's just something that attracted me in an old junk store and felt great in my hand. And, I'll have you know, the bigger version I bought for myself came in quite handy the day we moved your brother to his apartment in Boston. And we had the coolest looking lock on a rented truck ever!

January 20, 2005 at 8:52 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

I like the lock. Otherwise I wouldn't have opted to keep it. Nor would I have photographed it.

I like it, and appreciate it, I just never quite got it. I knew you did though, which is why it's still having the time of it's life hanging out with my other studio knick-knacks.

A.

January 20, 2005 at 10:09 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Friday, January 14, 2005

Sunsets

Sunset 3

Another stellar sunset from the roof of my office.

Blogger bruk thought:

wicked picture. those colours are amazing.

January 15, 2005 at 5:14 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

It was a wonderful evening. Though a Leica lens doesn't hurt either. Thanx.

A.

January 15, 2005 at 9:06 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Full Mixes

One of my biggest complaints about iTunes, is that it has such lousy support for full DJ mixes. If you've bought a mix CD containing tracks that play seamlessly on a standard CD player (due to zero-second gaps between songs) they will inevitably gain annoying pauses between tracks when you play them back on either iTunes or an iPod.

Until Apple adds a way to eliminate the gaps, the only option (and their official suggestion) is to re-rip your CD as a single track. The biggest limitation of which, is that you cannot pause the track, play another album entirely and then come back to your mix where you left off (the way you can with Audiobooks, for instance), a feature that is really useful on a 74-minute song. And that's not to mention all the valuable metadata you lose if you take 30 songs and make them one (but that's another debate).

To help alleviate some of the frustration, I offer OSX users this work-around:

1. You'll need to start off with a AAC of your full mix. You could do it Apple's way and re-rip your CD (which presumes you own the CD in the first place), or you could splice together a bunch of songs using this Applescript. You can avoid this entire step if you download your mixes as unified files. Please note however, if you have your unified mix is formatted as an MP3, you'll need to convert it to AAC using iTunes built-in converter.
2. Once you've got a unified AAC, run this Applescript to make your track "bookmarkable". Effectively, you are turning your mix into an Audiobook.
3. Remove the book from the iTunes library (do not delete from the hard drive).
4. Find the AAC file in the Finder and change its extension from .m4a to .m4b.
5. Import the new .m4b file into iTunes and sync with your iPod.

After that, you should be all set. All your mixes will play gap-free and will be bookmarkable, making for a half-way-decent user experience until Apple gets their shit together and listens to the torrent of complaints coming from beat connoisseurs worldwide.

If you'd like to add your voice to the cacophony as I have, you can drop Cupertino a line here.

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Quotations

"Let me be clear about this: I don't have a drug problem, I have a police problem." - Keith Richards

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A Plane In Front of The Sun

Sun Plane

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Thursday, January 13, 2005

Graffiti Analysis

Graff Analysis

This shit is so up my alley, I was destined to read about it.

Fi5e (AKA Evan Roth, an MFA student at Parsons) of All City Council fame has done it again. This time around he has developed a piece of software that analyzes the strokes, hesitations and other gestures generated as a writer throws up a tag. After the computer has captured the motion (via what appears to be a simple foamcore box and a DV camera) it can then plot the movement of each coordinate crossed by the letterforms, creating stunning minimalist pieces that he then wheatpastes throughout the city. Of all the people actually elevating Street Art to Fine Art, this kid has rocked it on the most conceptual tip. I'm impressed. Watch a video of the system in action here.

Via Wooster Collective

Blogger bruk thought:

that video is cool. motions of a tag....hmmm.

hey that talk with dee dee gordon sounds...i dunno, whacky. like how do people end up in those positions...reporting on whats "in", the hottest parties, products, etc among youth? well, i guess "cool" has been commodified for a long time.

January 14, 2005 at 5:58 AM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

The talk was actually pretty good. I was really happy to gain a little insight into how trend forecasting firms collect and disseminate information. I find their modeling and analysis tools to be very interesting.

What bothered me though, was that Dee Dee struck me as a person wholly without a natural desire to CREATE. Instead she has made a career based entirely upon consumption of others creative energies.

It just seems greedy to me. I'm getting so tired of being surrounded by people who don't MAKE stuff.

It of course also bothered me that she seems to have so little hesitation about doing reconnaissance for companies that so desperately want to co-opt authentic cultural phenomena. Someone at the talk actually asked her about "selling out" and she replied with the most canned, practiced answer I've ever heard.

I wasn't left disliking her, just distrusting her.

A.

January 14, 2005 at 9:45 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Deep Pressure

I love my subwoofer. Probably too much. I liken my love for it to the comfort Temple Grandin's Squeeze Machine provides. An evening alone, laying on the floor, listening to any of the Y4K records leaves me more sated than a bowl and a glass of Glenfiddich. I don't think it's my emotional attachment to the music either. Give me a nice 80 Hz tone, and I'd be just as content.

Blogger Mick thought:

I'm glad to HEAR it!

January 13, 2005 at 2:08 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

Well, you wouldn't hear a 80 Hz tone very much. The sensation is more akin to feeling a forcefield of soothing, rumbling energy pass through you, head-to-toe.

January 14, 2005 at 9:50 AM - Comment Permalink  

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Trendspotter

So, I went to the AIGA's Small Talk #5 with Dee Dee Gordon last night. She must have used the word "Maven" 100 times. I think she also mentioned something about pimping out the cultural wisdom of children to transnational corporations for candy and videogames, but I'm not exactly sure...

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Wednesday, January 12, 2005

Ligatures

Shuffle

I know I should expect this kind of consideration from Apple by now. But I'd just like to applaud their proper use of ligatures in the new iPod shuffle logo. Thank you.

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Tuesday, January 11, 2005

Gnats

Gnats

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Neckface

Neck Face

I feel like the world is divided into two camps: Folks that know and love Neckface's work, and those that haven't had a chance to, yet. Often celebrated as a successor to Basquiat, Neckface's naïve and illustrative public pieces are changing the graff game for years to come. Check out this amazing fotolog documenting his ongoing exploits.

Blogger hello thought:

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May 13, 2011 at 9:47 PM - Comment Permalink  

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The Mac mini

Mac Mini

It's about time that I can do more than proselytize to all my loved ones, pleading that they make the switch. I can actually suggest a realistic option now that Apple has debuted a $499 desktop dubbed the Mac mini.

I'm willing to bet that within a year I will have sold 4 or 5 of these things based purely on my zealotry. If only they had a referral reward program, so I could get one too...

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Blink

Malcolm Gladwell's new book Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking hits shelves today. Every trend forecaster, media critic and McSweeney's reader is gonna be on his dick all over again, so read it now before its actual value gets diluted by all the hyperbole.

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Monday, January 10, 2005

Bent MetroCards

Metrocard

The Post is reporting today that the MTA has begun modifying the subway system's turnstiles so that they will no longer give free rides to those who know how to bend their expired MetroCards in a particular way. As that group of people includes myself, and occasionally a bent MetroCard is my only ticket home from the bar, I am understandably sad that an era of quasi-legal free transit is over.

It'll take them a while to finalize their testing though, so we may very well have a few more free rides left during this period of twilight. I recommend bending the magnetic strip on your expired MetroCards a little over three-quarters of an inch from the right-most edge (between the C and the A in Card). Swipe 3 times, and on your 4th swipe you should be let through (if you've done it right).

If the above instructions fail you, and they likely will (it takes practice), you can learn the way I did. Just start picking up as many bent cards as you can, eventually you'll see the consistencies.

Via Gothamist

Blogger Daniel thought:

Sounds like the punishment for this offense has been increased dramatically, so I would be careful about doing that if I were you..I personally have never seen the people offering $1 rides but the newscasters on our local stations keep telling me that I have before..ok Rosanna Scotto, whatever you say.

May 19, 2005 at 10:27 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

The fact of the matter is that for folks with the 2 bucks, it's far easier to buy a MetroCard than to bend their way home; so they do. I do too. It's the reason that "swiping" is such an isolated problem for the MTA.

People like me are a anomaly for the authorities; most people abusing this limitation of the MetroCard system are doing so for profit, to make the money they need to eat (or drink) that day. I do not. I consider my knowledge of this exploit to be an intellectual curiosity, an entertaining hack, not a criminal asset.

I buy monthy passes for convenience, and therefore have only ever "swiped" for the sake of knowing I can do it, knowing that I understand how the system works. I've relied on this knowledge only occasionally, in the instances that I literally cannot purchase a MetroCard.

Frankly, trying to circumvent the system is more trouble than it's worth. The method I descibe above is by no means perfect, nor are any of the other methods that I've seen outlined online. All of the techniques take a lot of practice to master.

That practice is certainly worth it to provide for yourself, it's just not worth the trouble for me.

A.

May 20, 2005 at 4:30 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

One more tutorial.

May 20, 2005 at 5:00 PM - Comment Permalink  

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Loops From The Bergerie

Swayzak

I might be the only person on the web that thinks the increasing addition of vocals detracts from, rather than strengthens, the music of Swayzak. That said, their new record, which I was a bit slow to pick up, is really quite good. These kids have nice sounds, and even nicer equipment.

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Lost Lighter Telemetry

Traces of Fire

Volkmar Klien and Ed Lear have done something both incredibly simple and incredibly transcendent with their piece Traces of Fire, which they exhibited in Vienna recently. In this work they fitted a dozen-or-so Bic lighters with radio transmitters and then "lost" them in a dozen-or-so pubs. They then tracked the lighters throughout the city of Limerick, documenting the unplanned travels of each Bic. The resulting maps, charts, images and other documents of process constituted their exhibition.

Though many have pondered the fate of the lighters that walk, few have made the effort to examine both the actual circumstances under which they disappear and the human reaction to the loss of a inexpensive yet highly personal object.

Hopefully it's only a matter of time before I have RFID in mine, and the days of finding myself needing a cigarette without the means to light it are over.

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Customer Images

Finally, I will be able to download decent cover art from Amazon, as they've made a very smart (and interesting) move. Instead of bumping up the res of their cover images (as they've done in the past) they've gone with a much more innovative, broad, and cost effective solution: They're letting their customers submit images associated with every product they sell. You can not only upload gorgeous scans of vintage records, but also any image you'd like. The idea is that through a user-generated visual forum, potential customers will get a much better idea of what they're buying. I think Amazon will be right.

Amazon's "Customer Images" Program

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Friday, January 07, 2005

Ball Lightning

Ball Lightning

Did you know you could make Ball Lightning (AKA Plasma!) in your microwave? Neither did I. And it can be done with just a glass bowl, some super glue and a pencil lead. Here's a step-by-step guide.

Blogger bruk thought:

i dont get what the picture is.

so...u live in bushwick. i was just there.

January 8, 2005 at 5:27 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Timothy Ryan Enright thought:

Ball lightening huh? Sounds, as the french might say, "Made up".

January 8, 2005 at 10:39 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

January 9, 2005 at 1:42 PM - Comment Permalink  
Blogger Andy thought:

The picture is a little confusing. If you read the linked experiment, it'll make a little more sense. It's basically a picture of a glass bowl in a microwave, full of super-heated, glowing gas. The same stuff that comprises "ball lightning" a rare natural phenomena.

I'm on the edge of Bushwick and Ridgewood actually. 10th stop.

January 9, 2005 at 2:06 PM - Comment Permalink  

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